Good News

by Megan Thee Stallion

Released November 20, 2020 via 300 Entertainment / 1501 Certified

Reviewed November 29, 2020

Top tracks (based on community voting)
Shots Fired (65%), Girls In The Hood (41%), Savage Remix (41%)

While Megan Thee Stallion has always sounded confident on the mic, her confidence only seems to grow stronger as her fame does. Doubling down on sexuality, ‘Hot Girl Meg’ brings unparalleled levels of charisma as she effortlessly flows over a number of truck-knocking trap beats, creating some of the catchiest pop rap tracks of the year. And with plenty of classic hip-hop beats and easily identifiable samples throughout, Meg deserves credit for the level of subversion found in these anthemic tales of female sexual expression. – Dominick (7.7/10)


This album was scientifically engineered to have the most Instagram captions possible. While most every track brings the same strip club anthems that we've come to enjoy since the hot girl summer began, the first track, "Shots Fired," addresses the elephant in the room: Megan's alleged shooting by Tory Lanez. On this track, Megan torches Tory and the people who took his side over a sample of The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Who Shot Ya?” It's great to see her emerge triumphant and move on without giving the controversy and him more attention than they deserve. When operating in her usual lane, she continues to deliver, albeit a bit inconsistently. Nonetheless, Good News is plenty of fun; with her salacious lyrics, technical ability, killer features, and all-around bad bitch attitude, Megan deserves her place as one of the hottest names in hip hop. – Daniel (6.5/10)

The good news about Megan Thee Stallion's latest album is that she maintains an electrifying and erotic sense of consistency throughout it, and most of its A-List features worked out pretty well. There is horrible news about this album, though, and it implicates decision-making as the debilitating factor for the overall experience of this project. The creative control behind Good News sounds fractured and feels decentralized, leaving the artist what appears to be a diluted share of influence. Meg provides solid consistency behind the mic with a bit of dynamism every now and again, but everything else is too often, too much. The unchecked use of samples, interpolations, or references to recognizable intellectual property sounds expensive, but anti-creative. Too many hooks aim to be anthemic, and too many features are home-run swings, with a few big hits and too many misses. What is certain is 1501's belief in the drawing power of their star artist, but only when her most exploitable traits are at their nth degree with no room for subtlety. – DeVan (5.5/10)


Victoria: 9.5/10 | Alan: 8.3/10 | Dominick: 7.7/10 | Cam: 6.8/10

Daniel: 6.5/10 | Enth: 6.5/10 | DeVán: 5.5/10 | Hadley: 5/10